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Walter Myers III: It Is Better To Be Thought A Fool…

01 Apr

Friends,

Today I wanted to share with you a wonderful blog written my friend Walter Myers III in response to an article recently published in liberal leaning news giant the Huffington Post entitled, “6 Things Christians Should Stop Saying”. I posted my own comments to the author on the site, but Walter gives excellent, much more detailed responses to each of the points in the article. It is always amazing to me when non-Christians tell Christians what they should or should not believe. If you think that Christians are never under attack (or their faith), then look no further than Steve McSwain of the Huffington Post. Walter’s responses are Christian apologetics at it’s finest, so I wanted to share his blog with you all:

Walter Myers III

Walter Myers III

I recently read a Huffington Post article titled 6 Things Christians Should Stop Saying, written by the self-described “Author, Speaker, Thought Leader, and Spiritual Teacher,” Steve McSwain. I must say that for someone with so many titles I am completely underwhelmed. How someone who is supposedly so learned can be so ignorant of Christianity is quite risible. I have always heard it is better to be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt. This man has eclipsed that by displaying his utter stupidity and unrighteous contempt for all to see in the printed word. Now we know that the Bible is not based on anything mystical, but it is true, documented history of a people who just happen to be celebrating Passover this week as they have for 3300 years, and a man who we know factually was crucified on the cross 2000 years ago just as we knew there was a Caesar of Augustus at that time. Now I understand how non-Christians may believe Jesus did not raise from the dead, and I have no problem with that because it is entirely possible he didn’t. But the testimony has been demonstrated to be trustworthy over the past two millennia, so it is at least reasonable to say that belief in Christ is warranted even if it cannot be exhaustively proved (and if you believe there are things that can be exhaustively proved, then I would challenge you to prove what you had for breakfast this morning  exhaustively, as the only thing you can know exhaustively is what you are thinking this very instant).

Now if I have accepted Christianity based on reliable testimony, what can I do but accept what the Bible says? Am I supposed to impose my owninterpretation on the Bible, or read it for what the author originally intended? If this McSwain, who calls himself a Christian, doesn’t believe what the Bible says or that it can be interpreted properly, then why does he believe that we can properly interpret his writing? Wouldn’t the same thing apply to this bombastic piece of so-called journalism? As a self-proclaimed Christian, he is misleading many people so I would hate that to be his legacy when he goes to meet St. Peter. I will take each point below and respond briefly, as I don’t want to spend too much time on this nut case, as follows:

  • Point #1: If he doesn’t believe the Bible is infallible, then there really is no point in being a Christian because if Christ cannot ensure his words are accurately transmitted through the generations then we could hardly believe he raised from the dead. If you can’t trust parts of it, then you can’t trust any of it. It just doesn’t make sense and the only course of action is to look for some other explanation of how we got here and what it means to be a human person. Regarding the successful transmission of the authors’ ideas, we have literally thousands of partial texts and hundreds of complete texts dating back to the 100s. With that many copies and variation of no more than 0.5% across them all makes the Bible an astounding historical document without peer.
  • Point #2: Why does he expect the Bible to be interpreted any differently from any other book? The Bible is a book of written history that is to be interpreted like any other book, and is a book with a number of genres such as poetry, apocalyptic, the gospels, wisdom, and the law. So you don’t interpret wisdom in the same way you interpret law, and you don’t interpret poetry the same as the gospels. The fact that this escapes this man is beyond me.
  • Point #3: It is just utter foolishness to indicate that Christ indicated anything other than he as being the only way to heaven. Christ is clear on this, and so were his disciples. There is no interpretive “issue” here, or alternative reading. If McSwain cannot accept that the Bible says the only way to salvation is through Christ, since it was he that died on the cross for our sins, then McSwain should just ditch Christianity since he doesn’t believe what it clearly says. There is no crime in doing this, and shoehorning his personal views into biblical interpretation is one of the worst things any Christian can do. I think there is a special hell for people who do that because it is wholly dishonest and disingenuous.

To continue reading the remainder of his rebuttal, please click HERE!

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2 Comments

Posted by on April 1, 2013 in Featured Guest blogs, Religion

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 responses to “Walter Myers III: It Is Better To Be Thought A Fool…

  1. Michael Patterson

    April 1, 2013 at 2:23 am

    Awesome as always Walter 🙂

     
    • teemtwo

      April 1, 2013 at 3:07 am

      And you know this! 🙂

       

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