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Walter Myers III: The LGBT Movement and the Pursuit of Ends

Walter Myers III

Walter Myers III

The problem, in my view, with the LGBT movement is not that they have a particular view they are advocating for, but the manner in which they pursue it. Regardless of whether I agree with their ends, which I don’t, I could at least respect them if they didn’t have to demonize the church or anyone else that doesn’t agree with them. There is something to be said for being gracious when you’re fighting for a cause, and the LGBT movement scores a big goose egg in that department.  The odd thing is that they make a moral argument to justify their ends, while rejecting any contrary moral arguments. We see this clearly in that they constantly denigrate Christian values, while saying that their values are superior. But how can they do this? They say their values are “progressive” values that have evolved over time culturally, but what exactly are progressive values? On what are they based? Christian values are based on thousands of years of history and observation of natural law, and were validated by the resurrection of Christ. Now many may argue that they don’t believe Christ resurrected, but they cannot argue the historical accuracy of Christianity, and they cannot deny that Christian values, when properly applied, promote love, patience, hope, perseverance, and tolerance of others with whom they disagree. So while the Christian has a set of timeless principles to work from, the LGBT movement has no objective basis on which to moralize. So why should anyone listen to them? Demonizing those who disagree with you and seeking government to force people to accept your point of view is hardly a sustainable moral ethic.

I know the rejoinder from someone in the LGBT community will be that Christians are filled with hate and discriminate against gays. But that couldn’t be further from the truth. Christians are called to love and accept all human beings, and simply see the gay lifestyle as being one of many different sinful lifestyles. But Christians don’t seek to ban gays from living their chosen lifestyles, and don’t see their sin as any worse than premarital sex amongst heterosexual couples or adultery. These are all forms of sexual sin and I don’t see any Christians clamoring for laws that prevent consenting adults from entering into whatever relationships they wish to enter, even if they are wrong (which they obviously are in the case of adultery). They say that Christians are against “gay rights.” But Christians are not against “gay rights.” This is because “gay rights” are not any different from the rights of any other human being. We all have the same rights in this country by virtue of being human. So I don’t see anything special about being gay. If you’re gay, then you’re a human, and it doesn’t make you any different than anyone else. The LGBT movement would have us believe gays are somehow different and special, but I don’t see how they can rationally justify that. Being gay has no affect on one’s ability to get a job, love who they want, or live the life of their choosing. There simply is no broad or systematic discrimination today against gays any more than there is against blacks.

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Father’s Day Introspection…

Consevative Libertarian blogger Talitha McEachin

Consevative Libertarian blogger Talitha McEachin

One of the things I’ve noticed between the two holidays designated to honor parents, is that too many greetings toward men are more often phrased in a condescending way. Each year I see things like “Happy Father’s Day to the men who are taking care of their kids/doing what they are supposed to be doing/sticking around for their kids/not out in the streets/setting an example/not out there making babies everywhere…etc” – In other words it is more often phrased in the form of what a good father is not doing, and I think that’s a sad state of affairs. This is further exacerbated by greetings directed towards women on this day as well. Women aren’t fathers, so I find that especially silly. A woman who wishes mothers a “Happy Father’s Day, diminishes the role of men and in effect, attempts to render the institution gender-neutral – whether deliberately or out of ignorance. Excuse my candor, but being a father requires a penis, and if you were not born with one, you’re incapable of being a father.

I don’t understand why some cannot honor the institution of fatherhood without indirectly (or directly) reflecting father's daynegative images & stereotypes of men. I don’t know about you all, but I had a wonderful father who was very loving, affectionate, wise, a disciplinarian – his good qualities far outweighed any negative ones. I know some of you either didn’t have your Dad in your life or didn’t know him but just once, I wish those individuals would focus on the institution of fatherhood and honor it, instead of keeping the negative father/male images in the forefront of their greetings to men in general & the ones in their lives. After all, those who were not raised by a Dad, should understand (in some ways more) how important the institution of fatherhood is, having had it absent from their lives. I just don’t see this disdain on Mother’s Day, as if all mothers are good ones. Happy Father’s Day to all of the men who are fathers – with no strings attached. I appreciate you. I appreciate the institution of fatherhood. May God Bless you!

Psalm 103:13 
As a father has compassion on his children, so the LORD has compassion on those who fear him.

 
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Posted by on June 16, 2013 in Philosophy, Society

 

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Happy Easter Everyone!

Greetings & Happy Easter Friends!

For those who celebrate Easter:

Christ is Risen! crosses

Romans 6:8-11
“Now if we died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him. For we know that since Christ was raised from the dead, he cannot die again; death no longer has mastery over him. The death he died, he died to sin once for all; but the life he lives, he lives to God. In the same way, count yourselves dead to sin but alive to God in Christ Jesus.” (NIV)

 

For those who do & do not celebrate Easter, here’s some food for thought in the form of one of my favorite pics:

Awake

 

I have spoken quite a bit about American obsession with partisan politics & most of you should know how weary I am of our two party system. As politicians keep us at each other’s throats over various social issues, we are neglecting our economy & that we must hold Democrats & Republicans alike accountable for the fiscal tsunami near our shores. I want to remind everyone that I don’t care if you’re a Democrat, Republican, Independent, Libertarian or any combination of those. I want us to work together for the common good. Your political affiliation is not important to me. What is important is that we all are awake & aware of what is taking place in our great nation. United We Stand, Divided We Fall.

Everyone have a wonderful, productive week & God bless! I’ll be sharing more introspection throughout the week as usual.

 
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Posted by on March 31, 2013 in Philosophy, Politics, Religion

 

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Food For Thought

Friends,

tug of warI just wanted to share my morning introspection with you – it will be brief but hopefully encourages you to do some soul searching of your own:

I spend most of my day writing about politics & fiction but I also go for walks and I’m a very introspective person who wrestles with ideas quite often, on those walks. Recently, I was thinking that memory & the ability to record history in whatever mediums are available to, or developed by a generation, exist to keep us from destroying ourselves — that’s one purpose anyway. We have the benefit of knowing the outcome of certain actions or failures to act because of recorded history. We know what signs to look for, yet too many of us suffer from willful myopia. Two of the first signs that we are on the path to repeating horrific mistakes from the past are the gradual, alarming refusal to see one another as humans – labels replace names, that I see too often. Too many of us assign a set of traits & beliefs to a label & allow very little room for deviation or exceptions once we assign them – “You’re a ___, therefore you must___”. I confess that I too, have been guilty of this – we all probably are, but we don’t have to accept it as something inherently human. We can evolve beyond such low-level thinking, I have hope for us as a species. Personally, I have even more hope & faith in Christ.


Secondly, irrational fear slowly replaces logic & common sense. Even as some read this, they are immediately thinking of a group represented by a label who fits the description, rather than or before looking into a mirror. I have not yet given up on the present inhabitants of this planet, but the deliberate disregard for historical lessons is glaring. Given what small space we are limited to, in the enormity of the universe & the fact that we are technological Neanderthals in terms of space travel, I just don’t understand why we don’t extend humanity to one another more consistently. It would go a long way in getting along. If not for ourselves then posterity. Regardless of how you think we got here — via aliens or evolution or a command from God, we have to share this space. If all of the oxygen disappears none of us will be able to breathe. Folks, let us not be selfish, uncivilized & behaving as if there is no memory or recorded history to guide us. If you’re still thinking of others to whom this caveat is fitting, be sure to first stop, assess, correct & govern self. Anything less is a betrayal to your own humanity.

 
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Posted by on March 26, 2013 in Philosophy, Society, Uncategorized

 

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Black Conservatives & Liberals, Listen Up!

Friends,

Consevative Libertarian blogger Talitha McEachin

Conservative Libertarian blogger Talitha McEachin

One of the things that I have learned from interacting with black liberals, libertarians and Independents (of course I’ve interacted with whites, Hispanics & Asians who subscribe to these ideologies too I’m just talking about black people right now) is that they are not just ignorant fools whom, if they would only subscribe to my way of thinking and my value system, they’d be liberated. I have also observed that many of them share some of the same values and conservative principles that I do and some do not.

Liberals and conservatives have different value systems, so their political views are based on those different value systems, but certainly are not limited to them. I am convinced, that most Americans are neither extreme as the media would have us believe. Most people are a combination of political views and have things that they are conservative about as well as liberal. Personally, I’m a conservative libertarian who has been labeled a RINO, far right winger, moderate and liberal even, depending on who’s hurling the label and what the topic is. I tend to agree with the late, great Octavia Butler when she said:

“People have the right to call themselves whatever they like. That doesn’t bother me. It’s other people doing the calling that bothers me.

I stand with conservatives on abortion and I don’t want to be forced into complicity in such an immoral act by the use of my tax dollars to pay for them. I believe the resolution to the same sex marriage issue should be libertarian in nature. I agree more with liberals on global warming.Everyone should carefully examine each thing they believe without the bias of political labels or fear of rejection by their “political tribe”.

Black conservatives as a whole need to understand that the notion that our liberal counterparts are just ignorant as a whole, is patently false. Black liberals who think that black conservatives are mere “sellouts”, “Uncle Toms” or “boot-lickers” need to understand that not only is Uncle Tom a misnomer, such stereotypes are also patently false. I have no reason or evidence which leads me to believe that either group is more or less intelligent, or succumbs to name-calling or ignorant behavior, any more than the other. I know people from all groups mentioned who are more intelligent than I am. 

Black folks (and any community can apply this), I say all of this to say, that such stereotypes & self-hatred within the black American community, gets in the way of intelligent discourse, brother/sisterhood and a collective, powerful response to the ills of our communities. All of us are needed to make a difference. My Democrat, Republican, Independent, Libertarian, Conservative & Liberal (and any other combination that exists) brothers and sisters, united we stand, divided we fall: make a choice.

 
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Posted by on March 19, 2013 in Philosophy, Politics

 

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Are Thee Black or Are Thee Human?

Are Thee Black or Are Thee Human?

People write from their experiences mostly  & in my personal experiences, I have not experienced much racism, so when I write about it, it’s from research, talking to others that have experienced it more than I, and my own experiences. There have only been two incidents in my life growing up in Atlanta where I was exposed to it directly & both were on jobs. As I have navigated my way through my series on race, I’ve received a ton of feedback via social media or email. From some other black people, I often get messages explaining to me that racism does indeed exist as if I’m a naive & timid sheep needing to be saved from the slaughter, from the ” colorblind” butcher. It seems to be the opinion of some that I either haven’t ever experienced any racism, or that I’m a “wanna be white” or “sellout” (you fill in the blank), so I can’t see it. They couldn’t be more wrong about either conclusion but that’s their prerogative & I don’t lose any sleep over it. Has my experience with “race” made me more naive than the average person or blessed? Well, depending on who you ask, based on observation or assumption, you’ll get a different answer. As for me, my answer is perhaps both. The question is, do black people need to experience racism to be accepted as part of the whole? In the case of those who don’t, haven’t, or have very little – are we black enough?

I have seen racism manifested more with others than myself without a doubt but I have developed a philosophy of giving people the benefit of the doubt, especially if the alleged racism is not overt. I’m also not too naive to think that my experiences are not unique. I don’t think white people are racist in & of themselves just because they are white and consider that thinking to be quite lazy, to be honest. The same can be said for any whites who think all black people are New Black Panther, card carrying racists (or anything else), just because they are black. The irony is that neither the New Black Panter party or the KKK represent the majority (or even half) of either race but the American mainstream media (conservative & liberal leaning) perpetuates the meme that theyare representative of their respective racial groups. I’m not going to pretend to see most things as having a racial cause & effect just because I’m black. If the shoe fits to me, then I’ll wear it. If not I won’t. Some black people think that all blacks must keep with them at all times, a racial prism with which to view things “just in case” in America & I just find that a profoundly sad way to live.
Should I be on the “racial alert” in America? In my opinion, no. This “emergency” racial prism is carried around by some blacks just as I carry my emergency, rescue asthma inhaler. I don’t use it everyday it’s just there in the case of a medical emergency. Unlike my inhaler, some whip out that racial prism at first sight & disagreement with anything from the mouths of whites. People do stupid things for reasons other than race – bottom line. What I should be on the look out for are those who have not given me a reason to trust them, and until I have that, I’ll be cautious of all, for the sake of self preservation, regardless of their “race”. Making this survival tactic racial can get you killed, because one may let their guard down in the name of solidarity, prematurely. As an old friend of mine told me years ago, “I distrust everyone I don’t know on some level until they give me a reason to trust them”. He didn’t make it a black or white thing because no race is without the tendency for wrongdoing.

I find that sometimes when a black person disagrees with my positions on race & culture they do so based ontheir experiences, ignoring what mine may be. In other words, they define being black as a shared vulnerability & victim status that we all must have, unless white culture has permeated our thinking, rendering us therefore, unable to recognize this. Being black does not mean that I have  experienced racism, but in so many cases in America, black people have and do experience racism. Do you see the difference? I often get negative feedback when I share that I have only experienced racism twice on jobs because it is presumed that I will more often, because of my skin color. Some black people tell me I must be lying, or completely blinded to it. It is also presumed that because a person is white, they will at some point in their lives be a perpetrator of racism.  Having been a victim of more intraracial discrimination than interracial, I reject both presumptions.

 Being black to me is biological and cultural. I inherited my skin tone and other physical traits because my ancestors had repeated exposure over a long period of time to a certain environment, in which said traits were favorable to survival – nothing more & nothing less. The same can be said for being white or Asian. The beautiful thing about America, is that whether deliberately, through sexual assault or mutual love, now we have reached a point of having a nearly complete heterogeneous racial composition, so most black and white people are not “pure” anything. It kind of makes me want to ditch race altogether and just be…human. Just a little food for thought…Oh and for those who don’t get the title, check with your trekkie friends :)

 
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Posted by on September 13, 2012 in Philosophy, Society

 

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Introduction to The Elements

Introduction to The Elements

Some of you who have only followed my political & social writings may not know this, but I am writing a fictional (fantasy) series consisting of four books (so far that’s the plan) entitled The Elements. I started writing it in 2003 and Book I is due for publication in early 2013. When Kgosi, ruler of the Kishnu people refuses to halt his invasion of the neighboring villages of the Lungi people, and Nkosana, ruler of the Lungi people has ordered an act which unintentionally offends a foe that neither ruler could possibly defeat, Baba, the elder Kishnu sangoma or diviner takes drastic measures to preserve both indigenous tribes of the Earth.

The Elements is a story that takes place millions of years ago on Nchiyamolekuli or as we call it in modern times, Pangea, the massive land mass on earth before the division into seven continents. After a major battle in which many lives are lost and the environment is devastated, Baba, the wisest and most trusted adviser to King Kgosi, first exhausts diplomatic means then urges both rulers to leave their lands to seek refuge elsewhere. Baba has learned that the angered foe is Paytah, leader of the Nootau – One of the four elements (Earth-the Onatahi, Wind-the Makani, Water-the Iscindri & Fire-the Nootau) who live within their respective elements on the Earth and at times among the people disguised as human.

After months of failed crops and fishing expeditions do not produce enough food for the people on both sides; they are forced to follow Baba’s recommendation to leave for Kisiwachamani, a large distant island whose indigenous people may be helpful in supplying the people with food as well as medicine and shelter. In both the Kishnu and Lungi mythology, the island and the body of water between it and Nchiyamolekuli is the resting place for all souls before they are judged and returned to this life through the womb of a woman or animal, depending on their favor or lack of it with the ancestors. Warnings not to go into the waters or visit the island have been passed down for generations but; with the barrenness of their lands and the danger of attack from the Nootau known only to Baba, they are left with no choice.Once there, the Mwilimmoja – the island’s only inhabitants led by Nangaza and his wife Ina, agree to aid the Kishnu and Lungi. They only require that the Kishnu and Lungi follow their strict dietary laws and agree to be “prepared”. Nangaza explains that this involves drinking ugolo, a fermented beverage made from the forbidden waters, which will remove all illnesses from the people, thereby preventing the spread of illness to the island’s inhabitants. This is only partially true as the “preparation”also links all of the Lungi & Kishnu people physically in a symbiotic manner causing everything done by individuals to affect the whole population, regardless of their tribes. The Mwilimmoja after hearing about the war from Baba, which drove the people to the island in the first place, unanimously decide this must be done as they have done to themselves for centuries to prevent violent wars and maintain a peaceful society.The two kings and their people are so desperate that they agree without question, not having full knowledge of what preparation really is, nor the freedom or bondage that comes along with it. In Book I we follow this story from the invasion of Lungizwe, the main village of the Lungi, by the Kishnu, to the initial encounter with the Mwilimmoja of Kisiwachamani.

As I approach the publication date I will be posting updates and excerpts from Book I of my series. The irony is that I started writing fiction long before I started writing about the current political climate, from a Conservative Libertarian perspective, so it’s my first love. Writing & Reading great fiction is a passion of mine and I look forward to introducing you all, as well as the entire world with this beautiful story about peace & human nature. Please feel free to send me your name as well as your email address to be added to my mailing list for The Elements here.
From The Elements Book I Copyright 2012 All Rights Reserved
 
 

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