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Tomorrow…

Greeting friends!

Happy Independance day to you all. As you celebrate with family, friends, fireworks & barbecue, here are my thoughts & memories of what this day means to me:

Yesterday was the anniversary of my Dad’s passing and I was totally fine. He’s been gone several years now. Today I remembered us rushing to the hospital, and the coroner literally waiting right near the front door to take his body. The nurse who called us kept her word, that they’d wait until we got there to see him, before letting them take his body. I remember being hit with the reality of his death when I kissed his forehead. It had already grown cold. I knew then – he’s really gone. This is just a shell before me. I smiled and cried at the same time. My sister’s wedding was in two weeks and she had to face the reality, that he wouldn’t be there to walk her down the aisle. She wasn’t going to have the father/daughter dance she had planned. My brother was the last one to see him alive. “Lance, I’m going for a walk. I won’t be long. I’ll see you when I get back,” he said. Those were his last words, except whatever sweet utterances he whispered in the ears of Christ, with his arms outstretched, upward bound. Though they’d been divorced, and amicably so, for several years, I saw my Mom cry for the first time in my life. As the eldest child, I knew that I had to be there for my family, and we had to plan a funeral. My grief would have to wait. I held it in so tightly that my pain manifested physically in the place of its emotional twin. A sudden, severe toothache sent me to the dentist the next morning. My blood pressure was sky high. My pain was going to be released one way or another…

We got in the car to leave and the phone started ringing. His corneas were to be donated to a recipient in need. He had agreed to this on his license and they were the only thing they could take from a 61 year old man with heart disease. Informing us was just a formality. Then we had the heart-wrenching task of informing family and friends. He wasn’t ill, his death was sudden. But what I remember most and first, is going to his home, looking in the refrigerator and seeing chicken already seasoned, ready for the grill – it was for tomorrow. Tomorrow. It’s not promised to any of us. We make plans, but God is in control. The next day was the 4th of July. He was a veteran (USAF) and very patriotic. This makes me a bit sad, until I remember his destination. He was a Christian and very keenly understood what that meant. He made sure my siblings and I understood it too. Often he would pray and ask God to spare him the pain of ever having to bury a child. God granted him that. Knowing he’d transition first, he spoke of wanting to see his three children again in Heaven. That’s up to us. He and my mother have done their part. Ironically, it was he who told me that I should become a writer, or a lawyer. At the time I scoffed at the idea that I should write, or argue for a living. I wanted to become a research scientist. Hmm. Now I’m a writer and I argue all the time. I’m thankful to God for you Daddy. We miss and love you. There has never been a day that has passed by when you weren’t in my thoughts. In a world in which so many don’t know, or don’t have their fathers in their lives, I’m so happy and blessed to not know what that feels like.

Until next musing,

Talitha K. McEachin

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Walter Myers III: The LGBT Movement and the Pursuit of Ends

Walter Myers III

Walter Myers III

The problem, in my view, with the LGBT movement is not that they have a particular view they are advocating for, but the manner in which they pursue it. Regardless of whether I agree with their ends, which I don’t, I could at least respect them if they didn’t have to demonize the church or anyone else that doesn’t agree with them. There is something to be said for being gracious when you’re fighting for a cause, and the LGBT movement scores a big goose egg in that department.  The odd thing is that they make a moral argument to justify their ends, while rejecting any contrary moral arguments. We see this clearly in that they constantly denigrate Christian values, while saying that their values are superior. But how can they do this? They say their values are “progressive” values that have evolved over time culturally, but what exactly are progressive values? On what are they based? Christian values are based on thousands of years of history and observation of natural law, and were validated by the resurrection of Christ. Now many may argue that they don’t believe Christ resurrected, but they cannot argue the historical accuracy of Christianity, and they cannot deny that Christian values, when properly applied, promote love, patience, hope, perseverance, and tolerance of others with whom they disagree. So while the Christian has a set of timeless principles to work from, the LGBT movement has no objective basis on which to moralize. So why should anyone listen to them? Demonizing those who disagree with you and seeking government to force people to accept your point of view is hardly a sustainable moral ethic.

I know the rejoinder from someone in the LGBT community will be that Christians are filled with hate and discriminate against gays. But that couldn’t be further from the truth. Christians are called to love and accept all human beings, and simply see the gay lifestyle as being one of many different sinful lifestyles. But Christians don’t seek to ban gays from living their chosen lifestyles, and don’t see their sin as any worse than premarital sex amongst heterosexual couples or adultery. These are all forms of sexual sin and I don’t see any Christians clamoring for laws that prevent consenting adults from entering into whatever relationships they wish to enter, even if they are wrong (which they obviously are in the case of adultery). They say that Christians are against “gay rights.” But Christians are not against “gay rights.” This is because “gay rights” are not any different from the rights of any other human being. We all have the same rights in this country by virtue of being human. So I don’t see anything special about being gay. If you’re gay, then you’re a human, and it doesn’t make you any different than anyone else. The LGBT movement would have us believe gays are somehow different and special, but I don’t see how they can rationally justify that. Being gay has no affect on one’s ability to get a job, love who they want, or live the life of their choosing. There simply is no broad or systematic discrimination today against gays any more than there is against blacks.

To continue reading, please click HERE.

 

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Pro-Lifers: “Pray for Kermit Gosnell”

A group of pro-lifers began praying for abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell last week before his conviction and this is the right thing to do. Although he snipped the spines of babies who could have thrived outside of the womb with medical attention, in performing late-term & born alive abortions, and as depraved as that is he too, can be forgiven. Whether through abortion or waging an immoral war, the taking of life is wrong & can be forgiven through Christ Jesus. Gosnell is  72 years old and ironically, although he illegally took life, he himself waived his right to appeals to avoid having his life taken. Even he would rather live than die – how ironic is that? I pray that before he takes his last breath that he repents, truly sees what he does as wrong & seeks salvation & forgiveness. I hope he realizes that legal or not, first trimester or late term, abortion is just wrong on so many levels. One thing I have observed is many liberals expressing disgust for what he did (and they are right). But many of them, had he done this in a state that allows late term abortion, would have no problem with the very same acts. God help us:

“We commit to praying for the repentance and salvation of abortionist Kermit Gosnell, convicted of three counts of First Degree murder of babies born alive,” Kemper says.

“While so many people are crying for blood and for him to be executed,” Kemper wants to turn that anger into loving prayers for the eternal life of a man who showed a callous disregard for human life. “I want to start a revolution of praying for the soul of Kermit Gosnell instead of crying for his death. I want him to find the hope I found in Jesus.”

Please click HERE to read the entire article. Note that as of today (Tuesday 5-14-13) Kermit Gosnell has waived his right to appeals to avoid the death penalty & has been sentenced to life imprisonment.

crossesI normally don’t do this & know that I respect everyone’s right to choose their faith (or not). Briefly, I want to take a moment to invite all of you who subscribe to my blog or who will see it throughout social media to accept Jesus Christ if you have not done so already. Christ came an died on the cross and was resurrected for our sins. There is nothing to bad or horrific in the way of sin that God will not forgive. No sin is greater or worse than another. The choice is yours & please feel free to contact me via my blog, website or on social media if you have any questions about accepting Christ. God can forgive Kermit Gosnell and He can forgive you. This life only lasts for a time but eternity is…eternal. God Bless!

 
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Posted by on May 14, 2013 in In The News, Religion, Society

 

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The Oxymoron of the “Celebrity Pastor”

Consevative Libertarian blogger Talitha McEachin

Consevative Libertarian blogger Talitha McEachin

I think that the term “celebrity pastor” is an indicator of how spiritually lost some of us are. I have received several invitations over the past year to visit someone’s church where they referred to their pastor as a “celebrity pastor”. It really turned me off personally.The church is the one place which should remain uncontaminated by pop culture but sadly, what we have been seeing is not just the influences of celebrity/pop culture on many churches, but the outright surrender to said cultures, on the part of church leadership. The body of Christ should influence and lead pop culture not be lead by it. There is no balance with too many pastors. With all of the caveats in the New Testament regarding the persecution that believers did and will face, quite frankly, popularity, to a large degree is not something that necessarily attracts me to a church. Of course, this depends on what a pastor or his church is popular for (teaching the word of God or how well the choir performs in a competition for example). The Christian church is not a club, restaurant, sports franchise, or clothing line. Spreading the gospel of Christ does not require that we must brand churches in the way the world does any of those things named.

I’m not attracted to the churches of pastors who are not just assigned this title (anyone can call a pastor this large church congregationwithout his knowledge or acceptance of it, he can’t help that) but who embrace them & build brands around themselves rather than Christ. Our Savior, Jesus Christ often stands in the shadow of the celebrity pastor rather than front & center, where He belongs.

Celebrity culture in churches also fosters what I call the “untouchable” & “irreproachable” complex we see so often these days. Meaning, no matter what a pastor does wrong, he cannot be criticized, admonished, held accountable or in some cases, prosecuted. Even in the aftermath of scandal, when there is very clear evidence or admission of guilt & in some case illegal acts, many still worship these pastors as if they are Christ returned in the flesh & refuse to acknowledge that they are no less corporeal than any other person. I’m not suggesting pastors cannot be forgiven for sin because according to Romans 3:23 “We have all sinned and fallen short of the glory of God.” So, it’s not a matter of whether or not we should forgive but rather, should we continue to allow them to lead us? Should we obstruct secular punishment when the law is broken? After all, we are also commanded to obey the law, title of pastor notwithstanding. Sometimes a demotion (or punishment) is the best way to obtain the humility required for church leadership. As Christians, we must have something that separates the body of Christ from the secular world & the more pastors allow celebrity/pop culture to infiltrate & influence their churches, the more those lines are blurred. The notion of a celebrity pastor is oxymoronic at best but the only celebrity in Christian churches should be Christ himself. Think about it…

 “But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves.” James 1:22

 
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Posted by on May 6, 2013 in Pop Culture, Religion

 

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Walter Myers III: It Is Better To Be Thought A Fool…

Friends,

Today I wanted to share with you a wonderful blog written my friend Walter Myers III in response to an article recently published in liberal leaning news giant the Huffington Post entitled, “6 Things Christians Should Stop Saying”. I posted my own comments to the author on the site, but Walter gives excellent, much more detailed responses to each of the points in the article. It is always amazing to me when non-Christians tell Christians what they should or should not believe. If you think that Christians are never under attack (or their faith), then look no further than Steve McSwain of the Huffington Post. Walter’s responses are Christian apologetics at it’s finest, so I wanted to share his blog with you all:

Walter Myers III

Walter Myers III

I recently read a Huffington Post article titled 6 Things Christians Should Stop Saying, written by the self-described “Author, Speaker, Thought Leader, and Spiritual Teacher,” Steve McSwain. I must say that for someone with so many titles I am completely underwhelmed. How someone who is supposedly so learned can be so ignorant of Christianity is quite risible. I have always heard it is better to be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt. This man has eclipsed that by displaying his utter stupidity and unrighteous contempt for all to see in the printed word. Now we know that the Bible is not based on anything mystical, but it is true, documented history of a people who just happen to be celebrating Passover this week as they have for 3300 years, and a man who we know factually was crucified on the cross 2000 years ago just as we knew there was a Caesar of Augustus at that time. Now I understand how non-Christians may believe Jesus did not raise from the dead, and I have no problem with that because it is entirely possible he didn’t. But the testimony has been demonstrated to be trustworthy over the past two millennia, so it is at least reasonable to say that belief in Christ is warranted even if it cannot be exhaustively proved (and if you believe there are things that can be exhaustively proved, then I would challenge you to prove what you had for breakfast this morning  exhaustively, as the only thing you can know exhaustively is what you are thinking this very instant).

Now if I have accepted Christianity based on reliable testimony, what can I do but accept what the Bible says? Am I supposed to impose my owninterpretation on the Bible, or read it for what the author originally intended? If this McSwain, who calls himself a Christian, doesn’t believe what the Bible says or that it can be interpreted properly, then why does he believe that we can properly interpret his writing? Wouldn’t the same thing apply to this bombastic piece of so-called journalism? As a self-proclaimed Christian, he is misleading many people so I would hate that to be his legacy when he goes to meet St. Peter. I will take each point below and respond briefly, as I don’t want to spend too much time on this nut case, as follows:

  • Point #1: If he doesn’t believe the Bible is infallible, then there really is no point in being a Christian because if Christ cannot ensure his words are accurately transmitted through the generations then we could hardly believe he raised from the dead. If you can’t trust parts of it, then you can’t trust any of it. It just doesn’t make sense and the only course of action is to look for some other explanation of how we got here and what it means to be a human person. Regarding the successful transmission of the authors’ ideas, we have literally thousands of partial texts and hundreds of complete texts dating back to the 100s. With that many copies and variation of no more than 0.5% across them all makes the Bible an astounding historical document without peer.
  • Point #2: Why does he expect the Bible to be interpreted any differently from any other book? The Bible is a book of written history that is to be interpreted like any other book, and is a book with a number of genres such as poetry, apocalyptic, the gospels, wisdom, and the law. So you don’t interpret wisdom in the same way you interpret law, and you don’t interpret poetry the same as the gospels. The fact that this escapes this man is beyond me.
  • Point #3: It is just utter foolishness to indicate that Christ indicated anything other than he as being the only way to heaven. Christ is clear on this, and so were his disciples. There is no interpretive “issue” here, or alternative reading. If McSwain cannot accept that the Bible says the only way to salvation is through Christ, since it was he that died on the cross for our sins, then McSwain should just ditch Christianity since he doesn’t believe what it clearly says. There is no crime in doing this, and shoehorning his personal views into biblical interpretation is one of the worst things any Christian can do. I think there is a special hell for people who do that because it is wholly dishonest and disingenuous.

To continue reading the remainder of his rebuttal, please click HERE!

 
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Posted by on April 1, 2013 in Featured Guest blogs, Religion

 

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Was Jesus Accepting of Homosexuality? (Part 2)

My friend Walter Myers III follows up with Part II

 

Was Jesus Accepting of Homosexuality? (Part 2).

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2013 in Religion

 

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Teacher Ordered to Remove Reagan Quote from Classroom or be Fired

crossesFriends,

You know stories like this don’t even surprise me anymore because it’s common place now. In New York, a superintendent orders a teacher to remove a Ronald Reagan quote from her classroom wall that mentions God or be fired.


“The mandate letter signed by the district superintendent also requires that Silver not mention anything of God or Christianity to her students. The letter reads, “Except for wearing religious jewelry, such as a cross, I am also directing you to refrain from all other forms of communication with students during the school day (whether verbal, email, texting, written, etc.) that would conflict with your duty to show complete neutrality toward religion and to refrain from promoting religion or entangling yourself in religious matters.”

Also:

“Despite the fact that Silver is the faculty adviser for the student Bible Study Club, she is also instructed to remove additional scriptural posters and the club’s prayer box. Concerning this, the letter reads, “Consequently, if you choose to continue monitoring the Bible Study Club next school year, you must carefully re-examine [district policies], so that you can better protect that club from being disciplined and possibly banned. Under no circumstances should you participate in the club’s meetings or activities. Likewise, under no circumstances should you permit any club activities that could be interpreted as being promoted or sponsored by yourself, or the larger district for which you work.”

After the Democratic National Convention voted against having God mentioned in their platform at their 2012 convention, no one should be surprised. The teacher has filed a federal lawsuit & I am adding her to my prayer list.

Read the entire article HERE.


 
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Posted by on January 14, 2013 in In The News, Religion, Society

 

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